Other Island's and Cays Luxury Yachting Guide

From Sandy Cay and Sandy Spit to the magnetic allure of Norman Island, the BVI has a wealth of hidden gems waiting to be explored.

 

Fallen Jerusalem

The Coast of Fallen Jerusalem is tropical, rugged and regarded as an undiscovered edition of Virgin Gorda’s famous Baths. Colossal boulders skim the edge of the island of ruins, parting untouched sands and forming pools along the deserted shores. The result: A special spot for snorkelling and a peaceful home for colourful birds and costal vegetation. Nature thrives in Fallen Jerusalem, where visitors can delve into the undiscovered tunnels and caves whilst mooring at North Lee Bay.

Sandy Cay and Sandy Spit

Somewhere between Tortola and Jost Van Dyke, Cay and Spit go hand in hand as the most understated pair of isles for a daytime mooring. Despite their vibrant surroundings, both Sandy Cay and Sandy Spit are deserted, which is always a rarity. At Sandy Cay, you’re more than likely to have this National Park to yourself for the day. Meanwhile, the pristine powdered shores of acre-landmass, Sandy Spit are the best in the Caribbean and home to an erupted sand dune forming a glorious highlight. Snorkel here and you might even spot an endangered leatherback turtle. 

Cooper Island

Wreck Alley, between Salt and Cooper Islands, is home to some of the most beautifully preserved wreckages in the BVI. Intentionally sunk for the pleasure of deep-sea divers, the quadruple-wreck site hosts the Island Seal, the Marie L, the Pat and the Beata. At intermediate level (50-80ft), the wreckages here engulf stunning artificial reefs frequented by a crossed colony of garden eels. Head further north and there lays the wreck of Inganess Bay, broken in half when she sank, and offering great photo opportunities to help you boast about your encounters back. 

 Step into the rustic beauty  of Cooper Island Beach Club, complete with an on-site brewery featuring only the most tempting local produce native to the Virgin Islands. The family owned Beach Club rests on the sandy shores of Manchioneel Bay, offering a charming spot. Don’t forget to visit the gourmet coffee bar which serves their personal blended espresso and delicious homemade gelato. Alternatively, stop off at their island boutique, offering a vibrant selection of Caribbean spices ensuring you take home the soul, spirit and taste of the Caribbean. With shimmering waters stretching on for miles, and a friendly island service, Cooper Island Beach Club.

Salt Island

Spend enough time on the Islands and you’re bound to hear locals tell the moving story of the RMS Rhone, a 310ft Royal Mail Ship that sunk near Salt Island in 1867. The wreckage dispersed into three pieces and, despite its tragic end, is now brimming with sea life, making it an outstanding dive location. Unlike planted wreckages, the authenticity of the RMS Rhone creates an eerie atmosphere in which divers can almost feel the century-old ship come to life. A firm favourite amongst experts and visitors alike, you’ll be free to explore RMS Rhone alongside the multitude of underwater creatures that weave their way through the ship’s once magnificent caverns.

Wreck Alley

Wreck Alley, between Salt and Cooper Islands, is home to some of the most beautifully preserved wreckages in the BVI. Intentionally sunk for the pleasure of deep-sea divers, the quadruple-wreck site hosts the Island Seal, the Marie L, the Pat and the Beata. At intermediate level (50-80ft), the wreckages here engulf stunning artificial reefs frequented by a crossed colony of garden eels. Head further north and there lays the wreck of Inganess Bay, broken in half when she sank, and offering great photo opportunities to help you boast about your encounters back on. 

Norman Island

Embark on a unique and captivating nature trail as you are privately guided through the mysterious crevices of Norman Island, a region steeped in the rich history of a forgotten era. Soaking in the arresting views across the island, it becomes abundantly clear how this off-map destination became the focal inspiration for Robert Louis Stevenson’s novella Treasure Island. Its uninhabited routes of uphill climbs and tranquil pathways bring island magic to life, a true sensory escape.  

Other Island's and Cays

Other Island's and Cays

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